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Worker with an LW2 laser station

Integrating traceability in a manufacturing process - Danfoss Scotland case study

22/10/2019

Danfoss Scotland ltd are currently setting up a new manufacturing facility in Edinburgh to deliver products to the market based on the Digital Displacement technology, while establishing Edinburgh as the Centre of Excellence for this technology.

Digitalisation is a key driver in our industry and Digital Displacement technology provides innovation and the core product differentiators of efficiency and controllability.  The Digital Displacement technology will provide Danfoss with a competitive advantage in developing innovative Danfoss products and systems and bringing them to the market.

 

Danfoss purchased a Technifor laser workstation LW2 with an H10 hybrid laser and have integrated it within their SIT / Ignition MES system.  

This is how we make it work for us. The Laser Marking machine is configured as an Instrument in the Siemens Simatic IT MES, the CCU Variables and Marking Template are assigned as Inputs and populated by the data from the SAP ERP Software. These variables are passed to the Ignition SCADA system via a Telegram service, the Ignition system forwards the data to the Head of Line PLC (Siemens S7-1500) where the commands are transferred to the Laser Marker over the TCP/IP resource connection. The PLC controls the commands to the CCU through custom interface blocks developed in the TIA Portal.

 

The laser marks details on a moulded controller cover, a coated aluminium name plate and steel components for identification and traceability.  The laser marking system has a fixture with inserts for each part type to keep the marking height constant and ensure there are no set up errors.

 

It was important to ensure error-proof operation. We therefore added part detect sensor inside the laser enclosure with cables and connectors fed through the bulkhead at the back of the LW2 station, to ensure the system is not operated without a part present. An Ignition MES system controls the operation.

 

The operator selects a work order generated by SAP. The ignition interface instructs the operator to locate the controller into the nest, plug in the connectors and start the download. As previously mentioned, the operation will not commence if no part is detected.

 

Danfoss Scotland - Worker with LW2 On completion of the download, the Ignition interface instructs the operator to close the door for laser marking of the controller. The SIT system automatically selects the marking template and populates the appropriate fields with information contained within the work order generated by SAP.

By carrying out the download and marking in the same station it removes the risk of a controller being laser marked having bypassed the download.

 

The nameplate is used for identification and traceability purposes. Part of the marking is a barcode which is scanned at the next assembly station to start the station and collect assembly information against the serial number for traceability purposes. On completion of the laser etching, the operator is instructed to remove the part and the nest and replace it with the next insert and part.

 

Danfoss Scotland - marked part Valve sub-assembly marking

 

There are 12 of these parts per pump and each has a unique serial number in the form of a 2D barcode marked on it. The parts are part of a valve sub-assembly, the bar code is scanned at the assembly station to start the station and collect assembly information against the serial number for traceability purposes.

 

Currently Danfoss are allocating 1 controller and 12 valves to 1 pump under the same work order but in future, the marking will allow controllers and valves to be manufactured for stock and when assembled with a pump traceability can be maintained via a genealogy scan.

 

All traceability information is stored within the Ignition system.

 

The Technifor UK team thanks Danfoss Scotland for their time and testimony.

 

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Integrating traceability in a manufacturing process - Danfoss Scotland case study

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